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Day Before Congressional Testimony on Iran Terror, Argentine Prosecutor “Dies”

(Updated; 12:46PM) Supporters of freedom and rule of law lost a staunch supporter in Argentina this weekend. As reported in credible news outlets in Argentina and Israel, since not even the Argentine President has issued a statement, one of the Iranian regime’s biggest nemesis in the Western Hemisphere – prosecutor Alberto Nisman – was found dead in his Buenos Aires home under what unnamed sources tell the media are suspicious circumstances.

Argentina's President Christian Kirchner and her foreign minister are accused by Argentine prosecutors of working with Iranian regime officials to cover up Iran's  involvement in a 1994 terrorist attack in Argentina of a Jewish community center. 84 people died in the attack. Why cover it up? A trade deal for Argentina with the Iranians.
Argentina’s President Christian Kirchner and her foreign minister are accused by Argentine prosecutors of working with the Iranian regime to cover up Iran’s involvement in a 1994 terrorist attack in Argentina of a Jewish community center. 85 people died in the attack. Why the cover it up? A new trade deal for Argentina with the Iranians.

Why should you care? Because he was a courageous lawyer who took many risks to expose and hunt down radical Islamists, and those who support them. Nisman believed in the rule of law, justice.  The U.S. Congress and the Obama Administration must ask for a full accounting from Argentina about what has transpired. The death of high-ranking lawyer under these circumstances warrants the inquiry. And, without a doubt, his work needs to continue, including his most recent and well-founded claims. Justice requires it.

For decades this fellow has been hunting down the Iranians responsible for the 1994 terrorist attacks of the Jewish Community Center in Buenos Aires that killed 85 and injured many more. In 1992, Israel’s Embassy was attacked and 29 people were killed (for historical context, recall that in 1993 the North Tower of the World Trade in New York was attacked, 8 people were killed).

Nisman has been a dogged thorn on the side of the Iranian regime, who he ardently believed orchestrated the attacks. His work resulted in many indictments and INTERPOL Red Notices against several current and former Iranian regime officials. Yet this has come at a deep political price for Nisman and others who support him. So much so that two years ago, he was ordered by superiors not to testify before the U.S. Congressional Committee on Homeland Security hearing titled Iran’s Extending Influence in the Western Hemisphere (a lot of good video testimony available).

This morning, Nisman was supposed to present evidence, in closed session, to a key Argentine Congressional Committee about the latest chapter in his case: an alleged cover up by Argentina’s President Cristina Fernández de Kirchner and her foreign minister. In his politically volatile, but legally sound complaint, Nisman alleges that  the President and her foreign minister worked with the Iranians to cover up Iran’s involvement in the attacks in exchange for a trade deal with the radical Islamists who run Tehran.

Nisman’s work laid the foundation for many U.S. Congressional investigations and resolutions on Iranian terrorism in Latin America (by the way, the Iranians are still at it with the support of friends in Brazil, Cuba, Venezuela, Nicaragua, Ecuador and others). Nisman was a credible person whose death will most certainly raise more than just one eyebrow on Capitol Hill. In fact, I would not be surprised if what has transpired in the last week or so in Argentina will bring much-needed attention to an issue that will remind U.S. policymakers that Iran should never be trusted and that we have our own issues with the mullahs, right here, in the Americas.

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