home Uncategorized Reforming Congressional Oversight of the Intelligence Community Long Overdue, starting with Congress

Reforming Congressional Oversight of the Intelligence Community Long Overdue, starting with Congress

Sore losers. That is what came to mind when I listened to the outgoing chairman of the Select Senate Committee on Intelligence pontificate on the Senate floor this week. Take my word for it, she says, it was torture. That datum, repeated for the benefit, mostly, of the New York Times editorial board and Edward Snowden groupies, would become the political talisman of the week.

Then I read the executive summary of a document that drafters – all Democratic staff – tell us mere plebes is a serious oversight ‘report’. Almost as if on cue, the media advanced the torture narrative. There is even a book scheduled for release, just in time for Christmas.

This epigenetic politicking and its resulting report is a symptom of a much larger issue: dangerous levels of political immaturity and cynicism that I have not seen in this town since the term, “wag the dog” was coined in the late 1990s. And it’s dangerous this time because these folk are messing with U.S. foreign policy and national security. It was as if 09.11 never happened and the war against radical Islam over.

The entire oversight process, if we can call it that, and how this chapter ended, reinforces what we penned here in March 2014, the Left, and those who support them here and abroad, “will stop at nothing to extract their political pound of red meat, no matter the consequences to the current and future security of the nation.” The genteel nature of the Senate, and of politics in general these days when it comes to these matters, does not allow for such brusque conclusions. But make no mistake about it, the Left has been seeking to destroy the CIA’s statutory moorings since 1947.

This is not Congressional oversight, it is a political witch hunt. Let’s be frank, it reads like a senior year high school book report. A really bad report at that. It is political hatchet job, at best. The audience is not you and me, the taxpayer but rather, as this group is apt to call it, the international community. The hate America people. Vice President Dick Cheney was being magnanimous when he said the report is ‘full of crap.’

When one takes in to account what the intelligence experts have to say about what really happened, the Senate Democratic Staff executive summary reads like a senior year high school book report. A really bad one. It is political hatchet job, at best. Its audience is not you and me, the taxpayer but, as this group is apt to call it, the international community. The hate America people. Vice President Dick Cheney was being magnanimous when he said it is ‘full of crap’. Oh, yes, you and I paid $50,000,000 for it.

If the outgoing Chairman of the Senate Select Committee on Intelligence was looking for a Church-Pike Committee moment, she and her staff failed. Miserably. Although the damage she and her staff have inflicted on the national security of the nation may be just as bad as what came out of that process from the late 1970s. The Church-Pike hearings led to hyper-partisan oversight of the IC that weakened authorities and, at least in my opinion, laid a foundation that led to numerous homeland and national security failures, including 09.11.01.

Remember amigos that federal agencies, all them, are made up of people. Mistakes will happen. Always have. Always will. But the Nation has been around for close to 240 years and, all in all, we’ve had a great run. With a few notable exceptions, your federal government has done a good job keeping evil doers out of here. And there are people in the federal bureaucracy – tens of thousands of them – that are proud of the work they do to keep the country safe. It is too bad that a minority faction of the Democratic Party has exploited a challenging period to score cheap political points at the expense of the greater good.

The good news in all of this is that there will be new folks in control of intelligence oversight in the 114th Congress. And, yes, they are all Republicans. Maybe they can tackle the more sensible of the 09/11 Commission recommendations that has yet to see any action, reforming Congressional institutions that are charged with oversight of the intelligence community. They should also, and I think they will, ratchet down the partisanship and keep these matters, to the extent that they can, away from the media circus.

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