August 28, 2013, will be the fiftieth anniversary of Dr. King’s “I Have a Dream” speech. In this speech Dr. King said, “I have a dream that my four children will one day live in a nation where they will not be judged by the color of their skin but by the content of their character.” If being judged on the content of our character is the standard for true equality, then we are moving backwards.

August 28, 2013, will be the seventieth fiftieth anniversary of Dr. King’s “I Have a Dream” speech. In this speech Dr. King said, “I have a dream that my four children will one day live in a nation where they will not be judged by the color of their skin but by the content of their character.” If being judged on the content of our character is the standard for true equality, then we are moving backwards.

Trayvon Martin and George Zimmerman were two men from the same coin. Both men felt the need to define their masculinity beyond their character. One sought to define his masculinity through his fists. The other sought to define his masculinity through a gun. Tragedy was bound to happen when you have both kinds of men confronting one another.

For the Martin family, they lost a son at a young age. We do not know what kind of man Trayvon would become. Would he learn to realize that respect is earned through your character? Would he have learned to control his anger? Who knows, he would have become someone like Dr. Benjamin Carson.

Dr. Carson’s story is well known. Dr. Carson and Trayvon were similar men growing up. Both men had anger issues.  In Dr. Carson case, it was his reaction to almost killing a friend that he realized that he could not live this way. He realized that if he did, he would have been another statistic.

For George Zimmerman, he is left with a memory of killing a young man. Yes, the jury determined that it was in self-defense. But, time will tell if he will still be a neighborhood watchman or will he become another violent man with a gun.

There are those who feel the need to discuss the state of our race relations in the aftermath of this verdict. By all means let’s have this conversation. But the question I have is whether or not we can handle the truth. The fact of the matter is that the past couple of years our news media, academia, and certain political leaders are pushing this country towards racism.

Consider this. August 28, 2013, will be the seventieth fiftieth anniversary of Dr. King’s “I Have a Dream” speech. In this speech Dr. King said, “I have a dream that my four children will one day live in a nation where they will not be judged by the color of their skin but by the content of their character.” If being judged on the content of our character is the standard for true equality, then we are moving backwards.

We are moving backwards when men like Dr. Carson, former Congressman Allen West, former Congressman J.C. Watts are called “Uncle Toms” because of their conservative viewpoints. Or consider former U.S. Secretary of State Condoleezza Rice, who was drawn as an Aunt Jamima. The term “Aunt Jamima” is the equivalent of “Uncle Tom.” What many people do not know is that one of Dr. Rice’s closest childhood friends was killed in the 16th Street Baptist Church bombings in Birmingham, Alabama.

Another recent example is when a reporter said that U.S. Senator Ted Cruz was a LINO-Latino In Name Only for his conservative views? That kind of rhetoric destroys relations. We are moving backwards as a nation when we call people bigots or racists because we simply disagree with them and do not respond to the arguments on its own merits. Those people who rely on such counterarguments are more racist than the Klan.

Should we have this conversation? Yes, by all means. The issue is do we have the will to address it. Can the liberal media, our politically correct professors, and our leadership handle the truth that their rhetoric contributes to this problem or will they continue with the name calling?

This kind of rhetoric is a greater tragedy of this case.

(Update: The original post stated that August 28, 2013 would have been the seventieth anniversary of Dr. King’s speech. The math was incorrect. The correct answer would be the fiftieth. My apologies for the error.-AF).

One Response to Thoughts on Florida v. Zimmerman

  1. Arthur, I enjoyed reading your post. Recall the Senate confirmation process for Supreme Court Justice Clarence Thomas? Most of the time the ugly words come from the Left, not the right or from Republicans. If folks want to talk about the state of American race relations, have at it. It is a free country. Maybe I’m too optimistic about these matters, however, I think things are much better in this country than the media and the left portray it. The nation has larger issues at stake including an exploding federal deficit that is going to bankrupt our country in more ways than just economic. Let’s focus less on hyphenated politics (this goes for both Republicans and Democrats), more on matters that truly impact the lives of every American.

Your comments welcome!

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