It seems that events in Richmond keep taking a more partisan tinge. Harsh at times. Most of it not based in political reality. And, as I penned yesterday, increasingly ethnic focused. This is bad on all counts. If you want to move product you need less rhetoric, more substance.

Along similar lines, D.J. Spiker posted a piece at Bearing Drift that is worth a read.  “Democrat Overreactions Would Be Amusing if the Media Wouldn’t Keep Playing Along,” reminds us that it is not just the politicos that are piling on, it is the media as well:

all this press coverage does is fuel the Democratic machine. Despite electoral college bills dying in Virginia, Michigan and Wisconsin, Democrats are blasting out fundraising appeals to their base with facts rooted in overhyped media coverage on bills that don’t have a snowball’s chance in hell of passing.

Republicans are dinged for singling out the media for their public relations problems. Well, in some cases, it is true. The media becomes a de facto arm of the Democratic spin machine.

The best way to overcome this issue is to remain focused on solid ideas back by even more solid proposals and action plans. Increasingly we can bypass the mainstream media. Communicating directing with voters of all political persuasions is key for long-term gains.

Just take a look at Virginia Attorney General Ken Cuccinelli politically unapologetic race for governor. In the POLITICO he explains:

“One reason the American people got stuck with Obamacare was due to a devolution in American thinking over time that it was the government’s job to provide health care for those who couldn’t afford it on their own … [b]ut taking care of the poor is ideally the province first of families, churches, and charities, not the government. In fact, public charity was never supposed to be a function of the federal government.”

Republicans and conservatives: read, absorb, learn.

Conservative ideas rub many liberal reporters the wrong way. Some do not even try to contain their bias. Not all reporters allow their personal biases taint a story. Far from it.  But right now in Richmond, the reporting could be better.

 

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